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Teen boy with his feet hanging out of a car window - Teen boy with his feet hanging out of a car window - Childhood Wounding Relationship - Sandra Harewood Counselling Childhood Wounding Relationship - Sandra Harewood Counselling

A Little Known Fact That Could Affect Your Relationship

We all have a past. It's part of the unique story that makes you who you are.  Being overly preoccupied with the past perhaps isn’t helpful; but there are undoubtedly important things from your history which, when worked through, can help you fully experience the present and look forward to enjoying a future filled with rewarding relationships. I often notice with clients how difficult it often is for them to connect with any childhood wounding. Telling the story can feel like a betrayal of a parent, particularly if they identify with difficulties in their parent's story. For example, if the parent was ill, abandoned by a partner, suffered bereavement, or had their own history of trauma. It’s often easy is to connect with and understand the parents’ hurt. But, what this means is leaving the experience of the child (you) out of the story.
Let's Talk Note in Blue Speech Bubble on Wooden Surface - Your First Counselling Session - Sandra Harewood Counselling

Worried About Your First Counselling Session? Here's How to Prepare

As I sit here trying to figure out what to say, coming to mind are the complicated feelings connected with doing something new for the first time; beginnings. For many, it’s half way through the school summer holidays which leads me to think about the new beginnings that will follow. Children embarking into adolescence at secondary school, adolescents exploring newfound independence at university or in the workplace. And similarly, but in a different way, parents releasing their five-year-olds into the world for the first time to begin primary school. There is excitement, anticipation, hope and pleasure. But what lies not too far away, on the opposite side of the coin is fear, anxiety, disappointment, sadness, confusion and muddle.